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Yamaha Ray review

  • Published On: 29 March 2017
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Is Yamaha’s first scooter worth betting your money on?

The Ray tackles corners as well as any scooter with 10-inch wheels.
The light controls make this scooter easy to manoeuvre.
This Yamaha is quite a small and nifty scooter.
Even shorter riders can keep both their feet on the ground when astride the Ray.
Styling is a bit reminiscent of the Honda Dio.
The instruments are neatly laid out and are high-quality.
Seating is nice and comfortable for daily commuting.
Single-shock setup for the rear suspension.
The Ray tackles corners as well as any scooter with 10-inch wheels.
The light controls make this scooter easy to manoeuvre.
This Yamaha is quite a small and nifty scooter.
Even shorter riders can keep both their feet on the ground when astride the Ray.
Styling is a bit reminiscent of the Honda Dio.
The instruments are neatly laid out and are high-quality.
Seating is nice and comfortable for daily commuting.
Single-shock setup for the rear suspension.

Yamaha’s new Ray isn’t the biggest scooter you’ll find. In fact, at first glance, it’s quite pint-sized. It’s got youthful styling and sharp lines - it closely resembles Honda’s Dio, using dual colour panels to good effect.

On the outside
This 104kg scooter feels light and easy to manage from the moment you sit on it. The neatly laid out instruments are very readable. All the switches and control levers work well, and the Ray’s rear view mirrors are pretty effective. The scooter’s palm grips are really nice, and there’s useful storage cubbies near the ignition key pod, as well as a sturdy bag-hook.
The tail of this scooter is smart and houses the Ray’s large and flush-set headlight, which does a good job at night. In all, the Ray should stand the test of time – its overall quality, fit-finish and built-to-last rubber and plastic components justify this.

Power Torque
Under the Ray seat sits its 113cc, single-cylinder, four-stroke and force air-cooled engine. This is a button-started powerplant that puts out 7.1hp at 7500rpm.

From the saddle
The low, upright riding posture feels comfortable and right for a commuter, and the Ray’s floorboard is slightly inclined, but this won’t hamper you in any way. The scooter’s light handling and precise steering feel make it easy to ride. Even shorter riders will face no trouble placing both feet properly on the road when stationary. And this Yamaha goes around corners as well for a scooter riding on 10-inch wheels. Likewise, ride quality is good.

The MRF tyres generate good grip, and braking is adequate. It stops from 60kph in 20.95 metres. The Ray is as fuel-efficient as any Indian scooter with an automatic transmission. It returned a decent 41.8kpl in the city, and 45.1kpl on the highway.

Is it worth the money?
The Ray is a first for Yamaha in India – it’s the bikemaker’s very first scooter here. The scooter should appeal to quite a few urban consumers, particularly the youth. It’s attractive appearance and easy-to-handle nature make it a tempting buy.

Author: Droom

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