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TVS Apache RTR 180

  • Published On: 24 March 2017
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To add some flavor to the Apache line-up, TVS introduced the 180cc Apache RTR. What’s it like to ride?

The RTR 180 feels confifent around corners.
The only way to identify the 180 from the 160 are the RTR logo on the tank scoops.
The sporty, transparent mud flap for the rear tyre can easily be replaced with an optional full mud flap.
There's a 270mm petal front disc brake setup.
Simple and clear instrumentation.
Seating is quite comfortable.
The engine feels strong, but could have used an Fuel injection system.
Disc brake at the rear, and there's also the option of ABS.
The RTR 180 feels confifent around corners.
The only way to identify the 180 from the 160 are the RTR logo on the tank scoops.
The sporty, transparent mud flap for the rear tyre can easily be replaced with an optional full mud flap.
There's a 270mm petal front disc brake setup.
Simple and clear instrumentation.
Seating is quite comfortable.
The engine feels strong, but could have used an Fuel injection system.
Disc brake at the rear, and there's also the option of ABS.

When launched in 2006, the 150cc Apache took the fight with Bajaj’s Pulsar in the competitive performance motorcycle segment in India. In the years that followed, TVS came out with faster Apache variants like the RTR 160 and the RTR 160 FI. The entrance of Yamaha’s YZF-R15 threw the market on its head and the Apache series needed a shot in the arm. Not willing to give up without a fight, TVS introduced this bike, the Apache RTR 180.

On the outside
The RTR 180 is based on the previous RTR - visually, other than the decals on the bike, you can hardly make out the 180 from the 160cc. The only give away is the RTR logo on the tank scoops. The new sporty, transparent mud flap for the rear tyre is a nice touch and can easily be replaced with an optional full mud flap in the monsoon. The clip-on handlebar’s angle can now be attuned by four degrees to suit your riding style.

Power torque
The engine of the new bike is the same one that powers the former Apache motorcycles. The gearbox is retained from the earlier RTR. Unfortunately, there is no FI version, as TVS feels there is little scope for two FI motorcycles in the Apache line-up.

From the saddle
Start the bike and there’s the recognizable bawl from the engine.  The company claims the bike can get from 0-60kph in 4.15 seconds with a 75kg rider on-board. The RTR 180 is faster than the RTR 160 - TVS claims a top speed of 125kph. In the twisty sections, the RTR 180 surprises, it feels more confident going into a corner than the previous bike. The nervousness of the RTR has been shrouded while maintaining flickability. You can feel the tail slide away over bumps when leaned over but it’s by no means sufficient to worry you, thanks in part to those upsized tyres.

To perk up handling, the new RTR 180 uses tubeless tyres and unique construction that attains lower weight. Braking power is quite sturdy as the RTR 180 sets up a 270mm petal front disc and 200mm rear disc as standard.

Is it worth the money?
The Apache RTR, however, still does not come close to Yamaha’s YZF-R15, which is in a league of its own. RTR fans though will be satisfied with the new RTR 180’s stronger power delivery and superior handling.

Author: Droom

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