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Honda CB Trigger review

  • Published On: 29 March 2017
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The Trigger is the successor to the popular CB Unicorn Dazzler. Does it do as good a job?

Power is available from low down which makes the bike easy to use in everyday traffic.
Styling on the CB Trigger resembles that of muscular bikes like the Yamaha FZ16.
The digital instrumentation displays a speedometer, odometer, trip meter and cascading bar tachometer, and is easy to read.
The seats are quite comfy even for long distances.
The sculpted fuel tank and faux intakes give the bike a sporty look.
240mm front disc and 230mm rear disc setup offers good braking.
Overal, the bike looks really sporty.
The bike is a light handler for everyday city commutes.
Power is available from low down which makes the bike easy to use in everyday traffic.
Styling on the CB Trigger resembles that of muscular bikes like the Yamaha FZ16.
The digital instrumentation displays a speedometer, odometer, trip meter and cascading bar tachometer, and is easy to read.
The seats are quite comfy even for long distances.
The sculpted fuel tank and faux intakes give the bike a sporty look.
240mm front disc and 230mm rear disc setup offers good braking.
Overal, the bike looks really sporty.
The bike is a light handler for everyday city commutes.

The 150cc CB Trigger looks purposeful and modern – Honda has taken some of its styling cues from the full size CB1000R. The Trigger will sell alongside Honda's popular 150cc Unicorn in the competitive 150cc segment.

On the outside
When you first look at the bike, you’ll notice the Trigger’s headlamp is encased within a sharp bikini-fairing. It comes with a chunky, well sculpted fuel tank, with twin pseudo intakes right beneath it. The digital instruments are amber backlit and include a speedometer, odometer, trip meter and cascading bar tachometer. The LCD display also displays fuel-level and has a digital clock. Quality of the palm grips is good - they feel soft to touch. Honda has used minimal body panels and decals on this new motorcycle. The Trigger is a muscular motorcycle, with six-spoke alloy wheels - much of the bike is finished in black. Overall quality and fit-and-finish are up to the mark for this segment.

Power Torque
The Trigger shares its four-stroke, 149.1cc, single-cylinder and air-cooled engine with the Unicorn. The engine is mated to a smooth-shifting five-speed gearbox that shifts in a 1-down and 4-up pattern. The engine makes 14bhp at 8500rpm. The clutch feels light and makes city commuting a breeze. Power delivery is linear and available relatively low in the power band, helping to make the Trigger a practical 150 for daily use.

From the saddle
The Trigger’s upright riding position with wide, tall set handlebars makes it quite commuter friendly. Ride quality is decent too. The new Honda rides on tubeless tyres front and rear, and they provide sufficient grip, even when it’s wet. A 240mm front disc brake is provided while a 220mm disc brake does duty at the rear, Honda having given the Trigger a combined braking (CBS) system that works to link both brakes when using the rear brake pedal. The front brake works independently at all times.

Is it worth the money?
The CB Trigger has a lot going for it, including proven Honda reliability, but it isn’t the most attractively priced bike for this segment, and does have to contend with able rivals including segment leader Bajaj’s Pulsar 150 DTS-i, Yamaha’s FZ bikes and TVS’s sporty Apache RTR 160, which could prove no mean task.

Author: Droom

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